Biotech Articles
Publish Your Research Online
Get Recognition - International Audience

Request for an Author Account   |   Login   |   Submit Article
 
 
HOME FAQ TOP AUTHORS FORUMS PUBLISH ARTICLE
 
 

Agrobacterium: Natural Genetic Engineer [PDF]

BY: Rupal Dhoot | Category: Agriculture | Submitted: 2017-05-11 11:02:42
       No Photo
Article Summary: "Agrobacterium is well known for its ability to transfer DNA between itself and plants, and for this reason it has become an important tool for genetic engineering. A. tumefaciens causes crown-gall disease in plants. .."


Share with Facebook Share with Linkedin Share with Twitter Share with Pinterest Email this article
     


Agrobacterium: Natural genetic engineer

Authors: Rupal Dhoot, Meenakshi Dhoot and Dhirendra Kumar
Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics, B. A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand, India
Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture & technology, Udaipur, India.
Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics, N. M. College of Agriculture, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari, India
Email: rdhoot96@gmail.com


Agrobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria established by H. J. Conn that uses horizontal gene transfer to cause tumors in plants. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the most commonly studied species in this genus. Agrobacterium is well known for its ability to transfer DNA between itself and plants, and for this reason it has become an important tool for genetic engineering. A. tumefaciens causes crown-gall disease in plants. The disease is characterised by a tumour-like growth or gall on the infected plant, often at the junction between the root and the shoot. Tumors are incited by the conjugative transfer of a DNA segment (T-DNA) from the bacterial tumour-inducing (Ti) plasmid. The closely related species, A. rhizogenes, induces root tumors, and carries the distinct Ri (root-inducing) plasmid. Overall, Agrobacterium can transfer T-DNA to a broad group of plants.Yet, individual Agrobacterium strains have a limited host range.

• The molecular basis for the strain-specific host range is unknown.

• Many monocot plants can be transformed (now), although they do not form crown gall tumors.

• Under lab conditions, T-DNA can be transferred to yeast, other fungi, and even animal and human cells.







Size: 570KB




About Author / Additional Info:
I am currently pursuing Ph.D. in Genetics and Plant Breeding from Anand Agricultural University.

Search this site & forums
Share this article with friends:



Share with Facebook Share with Linkedin Share with Twitter Share with Pinterest Email this article

More Social Bookmarks (Digg etc..)


Comments on this article: (0 comments so far)

Comment By Comment

Leave a Comment   |   Article Views: 251



Additional Articles:

•   New Dimension of Scope and Career in Microbiology

•   Identifying a Specific Clone in CDNA and Genomic Library

•   A Detailed Review on Feeder-free Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

•   Biofortification of Iron in Plants by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)




Latest Articles in "Agriculture" category:
•   Use of Biotechnology in Agriculture

•   Plant Based Edible Vaccine

•   Genetically Modified Food - Yes or No?

•   Agricultural Biotechnology - Definition and Various Products

•   Career Opportunities in Agriculture Science

•   Synthetic Seed Production and Application

•   Role of Biotechnology in Agriculture | Various Agricultural Technologies

•   Biofortification - A Technique Used in Agriculture

•   Biotechnology in Agriculture Development

•   Biotechnology in Animal Feed and Feeding

•   Biofertilizers: Types, Benefits and Applications

•   Genetically Modified Food - Advantages and Disadvantages

•   Genetically Modified Crops as Medicine

•   Cryopreservation and Conservation of Plant Genetic Material

•   Biotechnology and the Coconut

•   Biotechnology in Rice Farming

•   Bt Corn: Method, Mode of Action and Benefits

•   Safe Insecticides For the Environment

•   Plant Growth Promoting Substances



Important Disclaimer: All articles on this website are for general information only and is not a professional or experts advice. We do not own any responsibility for correctness or authenticity of the information presented in this article, or any loss or injury resulting from it. We do not endorse these articles, we are neither affiliated with the authors of these articles nor responsible for their content. Please see our disclaimer section for complete terms.
Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape
Copyright © 2010 biotecharticles.com - Do not copy articles from this website.

ARTICLE CATEGORIES :
Agriculture Bioinformatics Applications Biotech Products Biotech Research
Biology Careers College/Edu DNA Environmental Biotech
Genetics Healthcare Industry News Issues Nanotechnology
Others Stem Cells Press Release Toxicology  


  |   Disclaimer/Privacy/TOS   |   Submission Guidelines   |   Contact Us